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the vixens

The Vixens

The original plan on The Vixens was a 6-part erotica series in the tradition of Sex and the City and Desperate Housewives. It was originally a ghostwriting project for an erotica website in the UK and the instruction was to “make it titillating to women readers (the market).” However, my client and I parted ways in the later part of 2012 and since they’re not going to use my stories, I can keep them.

The series is about six women who call themselves Vixens (female foxes, female bitches); each has a story to tell about love and being a woman (a single mom, a divorcee, a mistress, a widow, a wife, and an old maid). The grand alumnae homecoming becomes the common scene on all six stories.

After writing a few chapters (and a few sex scenes, too), I asked myself, “Where’s the fine line between sexy romance and erotica?” or “How far could you get to write erotic scenes without being tagged as pornographic?”

Related link: On The Edge: The Power of Titillation

However, during the course of writing, the timelines have changed after the client edited the first story. I had to straighten out the timelines while revising the second story and started writing the third. And shortly after that, I said goodbye to my client.

In the 2013 NaNoWriMo, I decided to start from zero, use the idea from these stories to come up with a trilogy.  This erotic novel made me reach the 50,000 word goal for the first time in my second year in NaNoWriMo.

I still don’t have an outline for the last three women although the Vixens should be complete and deserves a sequel. The big question is when.

Grab your FREE copy here or from Free-eBooks.net of my first erotica, The Vixens, and let me know what you think. Feel free to give me suggestions for the last three stories. I’ll be looking forward to it.

number one fan

Number One Fan

In 2002, I planned to write a trilogy about three newscasters, each having a story to tell. Inspired by The Bestseller by Lila Ramsey and The ABC Murders by Agatha Christie, I challenged myself to write a mystery-thriller using the nursery rhyme Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star as a clue.

It is about a newscaster who receives a bouquet of flowers and a phone call from someone who calls himself her Number One Fan. His message was to make him number one or else, someone will die. She dismissed it as a mere prank.

After a week, the police found her journalism professor dead. She then realized that it was not just a joke. With only the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star as her clue, she has to guess who Number One Fan is and who will be the next victim as journalists around her start to die one by one.

I wrote the first part of the Filipino trilogy, The Ratings Game in April 2002. However, while writing the second part, News Scam, writer’s block set in. I was stuck. I felt there was something missing but I could not figure it out. Therefore, I put it aside, hoping to find an answer in the future.

I never thought that “future” would take years. However, the idea still holds in my mind, wanting release. By the way, the third part was supposed to be entitled, Breaking News.

In 2011, while sorting out old files, I found the original manuscript, typewritten from a manual typewriter. Nine years have passed, and typewriters no longer exist. I re-typed the manuscript in my computer hoping to find a new stimulus while retyping and revising just to finish the Filipino novel. However, I felt something was still missing.

In 2012, I decided to join the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) for the first time. I used the original concept and wrote everything from scratch this time in English. The characters and plot have changed since then. Although short of 50,000 words by the end of November, I continued revising the story after NaNoWriMo. I finished the manuscript with 51,907 words, 40 chapters, and 208 pages on 27 May 2013.

On 6 June 2013, Foboko released Number One Fan, the novel I conceptualized in 2002. I felt relieved that the concept has finally found its way in publishing. Talk about being patient for eleven years. It was a long wait worth it. A few days after that, Free-eBooks.net released Number One Fan on its website. It is available online in .pdf, .txt, ePub, Mobipocket and a variety of formats compatible with Kindle, Sony, iPad, and other readers.

Since then, every November, I join NaNoWriMo to write a novel. Not necessarily the sequel, although I have plans of writing one.

That same year, I entered the novel in a contest. One of the judges in the Writer’s Digest Self-Published e-Book Award said that,

This has a really unusual and interesting setting for a mystery novel. This reader does not recall ever reading a book set in newscasting, or in the Philippines, which lends a really original cast to the whole story. Regine is clearly is a strong and capable woman, and her sense of family and responsibility as well as ambition keep the reader on her side. Overall it is a strong idea for a story and a setting that could support sequels.

This comment inspired me to go on writing. Until now, I am still not giving up on my trilogy.

To celebrate the success of my first NaNoWriMo novel, Number One Fan, you can download it here for FREE.

Is Bullying Disguising as Bad Reviews

Is Bullying Disguising as Bad Reviews?

Recently, while surfing the social media, I chanced upon a post where someone bashed J. K. Rowling and her Harry Potter series. Then somebody replied to that comment saying, “I’d like to see you do a better job! Write an extraordinary novel, sell more books and gather more fans and if you can do it…then say what you feel!”

As a writer and author, I do share the same sentiment. The guy has a point.

Then I received an email update from a group I joined in GoodReads announcing the change of our group’s moderators. The announcement was so intriguing that I decided to check the group’s Facebook page. And there I learned the whole story.

It all started with a bullying incident on a soon-to-be published author, Lauren Pippa. Lauren was about to release her romance novel, Learning to Love. However, when she decided to post her book on GoodReads (probably to announce its release), she was bombarded with negative reviews that already bordered or has gone beyond cyber-bullying.

Our moderators defended Lauren by posting a discussion thread on GoodReads and on the group’s Facebook page. The moderators showed those hateful posts then suddenly they were removed as moderators (that’s how I read and understood the situation).

Lauren conducted herself professionally and responded to the reviews well. I salute her for that. Although she has decided not to release her book anymore, she said “she has moved on, that she’s shutting herself off from this and living her life”. She deleted her blogs after that.

As an independent author, I feel sorry for Lauren. In an entertainment world we have, negative reviews from legitimate critics and so-called reviews can’t be avoided. Everybody has his own opinion.

I do hope Lauren continues to write and release her novel soon. Not because it will get additional publicity after this incident but because many readers, especially those who prefer the romance genre, would be interested to read it in support primarily of the reading interest and secondly of the author.

On the other hand, critics’ attitude should be more professional and objective. As what the guy had commented earlier, these critics should be writing novels, too, to feel the agony authors feel before, during, and after the writing process. Any author would respect a critic’s opinion if the latter has written something good or has established his credibility in literary criticism, rather than receiving a bashing from a “critic” who hasn’t published a single fiction.

What do you think? Is this considered cyber-bullying?